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Tuesday, August 9, 2022

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Date rape film screening seeks campus input


While the most common cases of date rape incidents are male-on-female, there have also been cases in other demographics such as female-on-male and the gay, lesbian and transgender population.

Women’s Resource Center Director Beverly McPhail held a Date Rate Prevention screening Thursday for faculty and staff from different departments at UH.

The screening showed many statistics that most people don’t know, such as the fact that 1 in 5 women will be sexually assaulted during their time in college.

It also featured real-life victims, both men and women, who shared their stories of being sexually assaulted and explained the emotional pain they suffered.

A typical rapist does not always have a weapon and 75 percent of the time they are someone that you know — a friend, family member or significant other.

Only a small number of victims (10 percent) actually fight back when they are being sexually assaulted.

A video at the presentation stated that “men are often pressured to have sex with lots of women to prove their masculinity and sexuality to their friends, whether it be consensual or not.”

It also stated that “75 percent of guys on campus use alcohol as a weapon to lower a woman’s chances of saying ‘no’ to sex.”

Alcohol is the number one date rape drug, which is often consumed to excess by underage people. Alcohol is also involved in three-fourths of on-campus sexual assaults.

The video contained two modules: one for women and one for men.

The women’s module shows how to prevent sexual assault and defend themselves and others. Most women don’t realize that sexual assault can happen to them. The first semester on campus for freshmen is the most dangerous semester for female students because they have gained more freedom and are often more impressionable or unaware of the risks they take.

In the men’s module, it shows how men who are raped by men feel the same way a woman feels being raped by a man. In cases like this,the motivation is more often a sense of control, as most male-on male rapes are committed by heterosexual men. The module also shows how to help prevent a sexual assault from happening.

Most college campuses make watching these modules a requirement by freshmen in order for them to register for classes.

Currently, this is not a requirement for UH.

“We are trying to make this a part of campus safety,” McPhail said. “Our goal is to eventually have all students watch this before coming to campus.”


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