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Sunday, September 23, 2018

Opinion

India’s Industry Opens Door to the World


The Indian trade show was staged in Pakistan in mid-February for the first time ever by the leader of Indian delegation, Rajiv Kumar, and his business partners. On the day the trade delegation came across the border, Pakistan was having a political crisis — the prime minister had to face the court for a few charges.

This was not a perfect moment for the trade show, but was very successful. A moment that was never imagined took place — enemies for more than 50 years came together in the trade show, enjoyed and exchanged conversations. Pakistani and Indian business leaders, as well as both countries’ ministers, sipped tea and had a lavish feast.

This showed how much the relations between Pakistan and India have changed since the separation of the countries. Even with the conflict of Kashmir, relations and the grudges have been healed.

For the last six decades — through three wars and one nuclear standoff — diplomats have tried, and failed, to improve relations, but now things have changed throughout the trade delegations.

It is remarkable how things have changed between the two countries. Even though there are still some hard feelings in the hearts of Indians and Pakistanis, friendship has sprouted. The coming of the Indian trade delegation to Pakistan shows the increasing role of its foreign policies.

Going foreign and promoting their business is one way India’s trade market can make more money. It was shocking to hear that India has gone to Pakistan to increase the trade business, but is pleasant news for all. Pakistanis and Indians tired of the fighting between the two countries sighed a breath of relief.

In addition to bringing trade to Pakistan, India’s leaders are also planning to make a bigger footprint in global affairs and aspiring to gain a permanent seat of the United Nations Security Council.

India’s fast-growing economy might be a threat to many other countries. Since its growing economy requires more natural resources, its business leaders have fled to Africa and South America.

India is doing what’s natural by traveling to other countries for trade resources.

“These are places that are incredibly important to India, but the Indian state doesn’t have the resources to maintain a major presence,” said Ashley J. Tellis, a former American diplomat who served in India. “Business has really become the de facto substitute for Indian diplomatic engagement. And that works out nicely for India.”

India’s growing economy may have surprised many people and governments. An expansion of trade and employment is also on its way, but its process is slow. India should work harder for the bettering of its economy and helping people find jobs. India’s unemployment rate for 2011 was estimated at 9.8 percent — which is not bad, but India should still work on making it better.

Saniya Maya is an journalism senior and may be reached at [email protected]

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