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Sunday, July 3, 2022

Life + Arts

Exhibition sails to Houston, antique furniture on display


This black and white photograph is one of the many artifacts that has been recovered after the sinking of the RMS Titanic in 1912. |  Courtesy of the Houston Museum of Natural Science

This black and white photograph is one of the many artifacts that has been recovered after the sinking of the RMS Titanic in 1912. | Courtesy of the Houston Museum of Natural Science

The Houston Museum of Natural Science is hosting Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition as a centennial anniversary tribute to the ship’s sinking.

“This year marks the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic, and we are thrilled that the over two million visitors who visit the museum each year will have the opportunity to experience this compelling human story as best told through authentic artifacts,” said Amanda Norris, Director of Youth Education Sales at the HMNS. “These are real objects and stories that resonate and touch everyone.”

On the evening of April 15, 1912, the famous ship Titanic struck an iceberg in the Atlantic Ocean. The sinking of the Titanic took the lives of more than 1,500 people.

The exhibition contains over 250 artifacts from the Titanic, a complete list of survivors and those who drowned and recreations of the ship’s interior, as well as a replica of the notorious iceberg.

The exhibition starts with an optional photo of the visitor before the Titanic’s grand staircase.

A replica of a Titanic boarding pass is then handed out with the name of an actual passenger.

Once inside the exhibition, the decor is made to look like the Titanic’s layout, complete with elegant rugs, luggage and a hallway of first class cabins.

There is also a recreation of a first class cabin with a bed, desk and armchair as well as a mimic of a third class cabin that contains bunk beds and minimal luggage.

Among the artifacts showcased are official menus for first, second and third classes, silverware and personal items such as clothing and grooming tools.

As the exhibition continues, the ambiance becomes dark and quiet with signs on the walls signaling the ship’s approaching the iceberg.

The replica of the iceberg is set to a freezing temperature and visitors are allowed to touch the iceberg for a ‘chilling’ experience of the ship’s final moments.

Over the years, the Titanic has been exposed to various metal-eating microbes, so the ship’s remains are in danger of being completely dissolved.

While most of the artifacts in the exhibition are in glass containers, some are allowed to be delicately touched.

When the visitor finally reaches the end of the exhibition, there is a list of survivors and deaths where they can see whether the passenger on the boarding pass given at the entrance survived.

Over 25 million people have visited a Titanic exhibition in museums throughout the world since 1997, but this exhibition contains more artifacts and history than ever before.

Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition will be on display until September 3.

Tickets are available at the museum’s box office or online. The HMNS is located at 5555 Hermann Park Dr. For more information on the exhibition call (713) 639-4629 or visit www.hmns.org.

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