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Sunday, January 20, 2019

Opinion

Texans need a lesson on secession


A petition has traveled around the Lone Star State seeking federal permission to withdraw from the union. There are a few things that must be assumed. First, Texas is the greatest state in the union. Second, Texas is the strongest state in the union. Third, Texas has the best citizens, servicemen and public servants in the union.

It is an absolute and appalling shame that any true Texan would advocate secession from the U.S. Disregard the fact that secessionist talk is about a hundred fifty or so years late at this point. The fact of the matter is, to turn tail and run all over a petty election is anti-American and anti-Texan.

It’s no secret that Texans view themselves as high and mighty and they have the numbers to back it up. Almost one-third of U.S. Marines come from Texas. Fort Hood is one of the largest military installations in the nation and has the firepower to take over a small country if it wanted to.

According to the petition, Texas could also muscle other countries out with our economic prowess given that it has the 15th largest economy in the world.

Going along with the assumption that Texas is the best state in the union, it is doubtless it will thrive as a sovereign republic. With this assumption in mind, it makes Texans cowards. The U.S. was founded on the principle that it is better to fight foreign tyranny and oppression together than to do so individually. The Constitution was drawn from the belief that to form a stronger and more perfect union, we must combine our strengths under a single federal government so we do not expose our weaknesses to the enemy.

With the entire country weak and the economy stagnant, for Texas to turn its back on our brothers and sisters is disgusting.

Those who support Texas secession and sovereignty must remember why they want to become an independent nation. The unique Texas culture comes with an attitude of stubborn defiance in the face of adversity and hardship.

These secessionists have forgotten our greatest legends. They’ve forgotten the Alamo, where outnumbered and outgunned Texans stood their ground despite having the chance to leave with their lives. They’ve forgotten Goliad, where Texans were murdered in cold blood by a ruthless tyrant. On top of that, they’ve forgotten previous Texans who fought for the U.S. in the world wars. These secessionists are traitors, backstabbers and cowards.

This is not to say the secessionists don’t have my sympathy. It’s clear that the rest of the nation looks down on our great state. Californians and New Yorkers sneer at Texans and paint them as backwards rubes who ride horses to Walmart. New media has enforced the image of fat, lazy and racist rednecks who marry our sisters and sleep with our cattle. I’d like nothing more than to shove Texas sovereignty in their faces and politely advise them to perform a sexually impossible act with themselves. Despite this, running away from the fight is not how Texans do things.

The petition has garnered widespread support since its introduction Friday. Monday morning, the petition had about 16,000 signatures. Tuesday morning, there were 61,000. It is sad to see so many Texans ready to run from a fight even when they have the upper hand. They forget the Texas exceptionalism that inspired secessionist dreams in the first place. One day, and hopefully that day never comes, Texas may secede from the U.S. once it has been shown there is no longer a United States to belong to. The only legitimate reason for secession is repeated abuse and neglect by the federal government.

The U.S. is neither decaying nor improving. It remains stagnant. The fight can still be won and Texans can still lead the way. Texas is not alone in the secessionist struggle. According to The Daily Caller, 46 other states have citizens that filed similar petitions to secede. The eyes of America are upon Texas, and it is time to show that Texas colors are the same as America’s. And those colors just don’t run.

James Wang is a history sophomore and may be reached at [email protected]

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