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Friday, December 6, 2019

Academics & Research

Documentary of migrant workers to be screened


The Hispanic Student Association and Women and Children Welcoming Committee will hold a free movie screening and panel discussion on Oct. 1 titled “The Real Death Valley,” which investigates a 40-mile trail where hundreds of migrants died after crossing the border, while others still struggle to survive.

Aerial Views Of The U.S.-Mexico Border On The Rio Grande

A forensic anthropology team from Baylor University place the remains of unidentified immigrants exhumed from a cemetery on May 21, 2013 in Falfurrias, TX.  |  Courtesy of Weather Films

The film by the Weather Channel and Telemundo shows the obstacles to these immigrants’ journeys, such as 110-degree weather and the long miles that must be crossed by foot in order to detour from border patrol.

The discussion will count on Associate Professor of Hispanic Studies Cristina Sisk, Associate Professor of Anthropology Christine Kovic and immigration activist Maria Jimenez as panelists. 

Hispanic Student Association President Jorge Olvera said that immigration is an ongoing issue that “affects each and everyone of us living in the state.” He said the subject of migrant children at the border is gradually losing its spotlight and being replaced by other prominent issues on the news.

“The movie is interesting because it takes a view of what happens when you are one of the lucky ones who make it across the border,” Olvera said. “Oftentimes making it to the border is the easiest part of the journey, making it across the Texas terrain is not.”

Olvera said that people need to be educated about immigration before they can do something about it. Anyone can attend the showing of “The Real Death Valley” on Wednesday in the Graduate College of Social work.

“It is important for us to be aware of what is happening in our back yard,” Olvera said.

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