side bar
logo
Monday, June 27, 2022

Movies

Documentarian stresses the importance of local produce


“Food Fight” was the debut film project from director Chris Taylor’s co-founded production company Positively 25th Street. The documentary was released in 2008 and has received eight awards to date. | Bethel Glumac/The Daily Cougar

“Food Fight” was the debut film project from director Chris Taylor’s co-founded production company Positively 25th Street. The documentary was released in 2008 and has received eight awards to date. | Bethel Glumac/The Daily Cougar

“Food Fight” is a self-described passion project for producer and director Chris Taylor. His first documentary outlines the recent counter-revolution against large food corporations that are contributing to the decline of food quality and nutrition.

“What I portray here is essentially a revolution of taste and a sensation of sensuality and joyful eating with family and friends,” Taylor said.

A graduate of Harvard University, Taylor co-founded his own film-production company, after he auctioned off part of a rare wine collection he had formed during a span of 15 years.

Taylor’s piece features some legislation supporting the food movement — like the Farm Bill, which encourages environmentally friendly farming practices and aims to ensure the economic stability of farmers and ranchers.

It aims to influence agricultural activity that will protect farmland and encourage the development of a healthier food system. In previous years it has been unsuccessful at getting passed, but Taylor believes there is still good news.

“The consumer wasn’t being represented in the past. Now there is a lot more exposure for the farm bill so people are paying attention,” Taylor said. “There is more transparency, and that’s the good news.”

“Food Fight” encourages the use of independent markets because of the superiority in quality and taste it offers consumers. Farmer markets may not be as accessible and convenient for many, but it is all about providing a range of options for the young consumer, Taylor said.

While they may be more expensive, options help support the farmers who keep the land free of harmful pesticides. By supporting them, consumers play a role in keeping their local communities environmentally safe.

“The best possible way to spend your food dollars is patronizing farmers in your local area and allowing them to have a nice income. In a standard three-tier system, the farmer is getting 10 to 12 cents of the food dollar. At a farmers market they’re getting more like 75 cents, so that’s a big difference,” Taylor said.

According to Taylor, economics also form part of the food revolution and recent changes by the restaurant culture have contributed to the push for change.

Restaurateur Wolfgang Puck recently made the change to exclusively use organic products and Taylor thinks the effects of the multi-million dollar company’s decision will be a huge win for the environment.

While decisions like these are part of the driving force behind organic agriculture, Taylor reminds people how important personal daily choices are to the success of the food movement.

“We need to take back our dollars and put them where they’ll do the most good for us,” Taylor said. “That should always be at the front of your mind — keeping your dollars local and keeping them out of multinationals in general.”

[email protected]

Tags: , , ,


Back to Top ↑
  • COVID-19
  • Sign up for our Email Edition

  • Follow us on Twitter

  • Polls

    How are your classes going so far?

    View Results

    Loading ... Loading ...