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Wednesday, December 7, 2022

Opinion

Sexual equality could be cured with a little, pink pill


tamor khan- flibanserin

Tamor Khan/The Cougar

No longer do females have to remain the submissive creatures that America has labeled them. A shift in sexual equality is arising, and the revolution comes in a little pink pill labeled Flibanserin.

Flibanserin, developed by a company called Sprout Pharmaceuticals, is the female counterpart to Viagra.

According to the New York Times, it would become the first drug to treat a lack of sexual desire in women.

It’s a drug that could revolutionize female libido in ways that “50 Shades of Grey” hasn’t.

“Flibanserin is a novel, non-hormonal pill to treat hypo-active sexual desire disorder in pre-menopausal women,” said Sprout CEO Cindy Whitehead.

Recently, the prudes of the Food and Drug Administration advisory committee made a bold move by voting 18-6 in favor of regulation.  In the past, Flibanserin had been rejected twice due to potential side effects like low-blood pressure, nausea, dizziness and fainting.

Interestingly enough, these side effects seem minimal compared to potential side effects of Viagra.

Viagra can cause sudden vision loss, irregular heartbeat and a painful erection that can last longer than four hours.

Ask any man if they would prefer fainting or a painful four hour-long erection. Clearly the side effects for Viagra are much worse.

Perhaps the real reasons behind Flibanserin’s previous rejection are not as clear cut as the FDA wanted them to seem.

One might assume FDA isn’t too concerned with side effects over how profitable a drug might be in advertising aspects. Viagra made 1.6 million dollars ion 2014 alone, according to Statista.

Is the FDA afraid that no one would fund advertising a drug that would break the mold on female stereotypes for sexual virtue?

Feminists would argue that advocating women’s sexuality is put on the back burner by America.

“We do not believe there has been any gender bias with regard to our review of this drug,” the FDA said.

“We engaged in a scientific process in which we evaluated whether the drug’s benefits outweigh its risk.”

The FDA cannot deny that a drug for female libido says loud and clear women of the future are dressed in desire rather than daintiness.

A final decision of approval will commence in August. Until then, women will have to continue finding creative outlets that can repress the angst of gender inequality.

Opinion columnist Phylicia Sneed is an english senior and may be reached at [email protected]

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